The impact of interdisciplinary case management on client outcomes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess impact, outcome data were analyzed from an interdisciplinary case management program based on the Omaha Systems model. The study population of 54 clients was 98 percent female and 98 percent Hispanic, with 65 percent having not completed high school. Clients averaged seven problems: 43 percent were psychosocial, 23 percent environmental, 19 percent physiological, and 15 percent health-related behaviors. Interventions (12.4/client) were primarily educational (53%) and case management (19%). Effect sizes for impact were moderate to very large (0.4 to 1.5; p ≤ 0.002) for knowledge, behavior, and status outcomes. The results indicate that interdisciplinary case management using the Omaha Systems model can affect significantly outcomes related to specific problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-48
Number of pages19
JournalFamily and Community Health
Volume22
Issue number3
StatePublished - Oct 1999

Fingerprint

case management
Case Management
system model
Hispanic Americans
Health
health
school
Population

Keywords

  • Case management
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Minority
  • Outcomes
  • Underserved

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The impact of interdisciplinary case management on client outcomes. / Slack, Marion K; Mcewen, Marylyn M.

In: Family and Community Health, Vol. 22, No. 3, 10.1999, p. 30-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8452d120619b4a80b4c12ce2ca00a022,
title = "The impact of interdisciplinary case management on client outcomes",
abstract = "To assess impact, outcome data were analyzed from an interdisciplinary case management program based on the Omaha Systems model. The study population of 54 clients was 98 percent female and 98 percent Hispanic, with 65 percent having not completed high school. Clients averaged seven problems: 43 percent were psychosocial, 23 percent environmental, 19 percent physiological, and 15 percent health-related behaviors. Interventions (12.4/client) were primarily educational (53{\%}) and case management (19{\%}). Effect sizes for impact were moderate to very large (0.4 to 1.5; p ≤ 0.002) for knowledge, behavior, and status outcomes. The results indicate that interdisciplinary case management using the Omaha Systems model can affect significantly outcomes related to specific problems.",
keywords = "Case management, Interdisciplinary, Minority, Outcomes, Underserved",
author = "Slack, {Marion K} and Mcewen, {Marylyn M}",
year = "1999",
month = "10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "30--48",
journal = "Family and Community Health",
issn = "0160-6379",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of interdisciplinary case management on client outcomes

AU - Slack, Marion K

AU - Mcewen, Marylyn M

PY - 1999/10

Y1 - 1999/10

N2 - To assess impact, outcome data were analyzed from an interdisciplinary case management program based on the Omaha Systems model. The study population of 54 clients was 98 percent female and 98 percent Hispanic, with 65 percent having not completed high school. Clients averaged seven problems: 43 percent were psychosocial, 23 percent environmental, 19 percent physiological, and 15 percent health-related behaviors. Interventions (12.4/client) were primarily educational (53%) and case management (19%). Effect sizes for impact were moderate to very large (0.4 to 1.5; p ≤ 0.002) for knowledge, behavior, and status outcomes. The results indicate that interdisciplinary case management using the Omaha Systems model can affect significantly outcomes related to specific problems.

AB - To assess impact, outcome data were analyzed from an interdisciplinary case management program based on the Omaha Systems model. The study population of 54 clients was 98 percent female and 98 percent Hispanic, with 65 percent having not completed high school. Clients averaged seven problems: 43 percent were psychosocial, 23 percent environmental, 19 percent physiological, and 15 percent health-related behaviors. Interventions (12.4/client) were primarily educational (53%) and case management (19%). Effect sizes for impact were moderate to very large (0.4 to 1.5; p ≤ 0.002) for knowledge, behavior, and status outcomes. The results indicate that interdisciplinary case management using the Omaha Systems model can affect significantly outcomes related to specific problems.

KW - Case management

KW - Interdisciplinary

KW - Minority

KW - Outcomes

KW - Underserved

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0009443783&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0009443783&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0009443783

VL - 22

SP - 30

EP - 48

JO - Family and Community Health

JF - Family and Community Health

SN - 0160-6379

IS - 3

ER -