The large binocular telescope interferometer

Philip M Hinz, J Roger P Angel, Donald W Mccarthy, William F. Hoffmann, Chien Y. Peng

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Large Binocular Telescope (LET), with dual 8.4 m optics on a common mount, is unique among the large-aperture interferometers. Deformable secondaries on the telescope capable of adaptive atmospheric correction allow beam combination after only three warm reflections. The design allows the implementation of two powerful uses of interferometry: suppression of starlight (or nulling interferometry) and wide-field imaging (or Fizeau interferometry). Nulling will allow detection of extrasolar planetary systems (from either zodiacal emission or giant planets) down to solar system-equivalent levels for nearby stars. This will dramatically increase our knowledge of the prevalence and make-up of extrasolar planetary systems. Fizeau interferometry will allow imaging of even complex structure at the resolution of a 22.8 m telescope. To implement these two powerful techniques the University of Arizona and NASA are collaborating to build the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) a cryogenic instrument capable of sensitive interferometric observations in the infrared.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsW.A. Traub
Pages108-112
Number of pages5
Volume4838
Edition1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
EventInterferometry for Optical Astronomy II - Waikoloa, HI, United States
Duration: Aug 22 2002Aug 28 2002

Other

OtherInterferometry for Optical Astronomy II
CountryUnited States
CityWaikoloa, HI
Period8/22/028/28/02

Fingerprint

Binoculars
Interferometry
Telescopes
Interferometers
interferometry
interferometers
telescopes
planetary systems
Imaging techniques
atmospheric correction
Solar system
Planets
solar system
Cryogenics
Stars
cryogenics
NASA
planets
Optics
apertures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Hinz, P. M., Angel, J. R. P., Mccarthy, D. W., Hoffmann, W. F., & Peng, C. Y. (2002). The large binocular telescope interferometer. In W. A. Traub (Ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (1 ed., Vol. 4838, pp. 108-112) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.459338

The large binocular telescope interferometer. / Hinz, Philip M; Angel, J Roger P; Mccarthy, Donald W; Hoffmann, William F.; Peng, Chien Y.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / W.A. Traub. Vol. 4838 1. ed. 2002. p. 108-112.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hinz, PM, Angel, JRP, Mccarthy, DW, Hoffmann, WF & Peng, CY 2002, The large binocular telescope interferometer. in WA Traub (ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. 1 edn, vol. 4838, pp. 108-112, Interferometry for Optical Astronomy II, Waikoloa, HI, United States, 8/22/02. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.459338
Hinz PM, Angel JRP, Mccarthy DW, Hoffmann WF, Peng CY. The large binocular telescope interferometer. In Traub WA, editor, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. 1 ed. Vol. 4838. 2002. p. 108-112 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.459338
Hinz, Philip M ; Angel, J Roger P ; Mccarthy, Donald W ; Hoffmann, William F. ; Peng, Chien Y. / The large binocular telescope interferometer. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / W.A. Traub. Vol. 4838 1. ed. 2002. pp. 108-112
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