The late psychosocial consequences of childhood cancer

Ida M Moore, Martin E. Glasser, Arthur R. Ablin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As more children survive childhood cancer, the long-term emotional sequelae of the disease and its therapy become of considerable importance. This study investigated the overall psychosocial functioning and specific concerns of 36 children who were long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia or a solid tumor that did not involve the central nervous system. Findings from the Deasy-Spinetta Behavioral Questionnaire reveal that children treated for leukemia were functioning at a level below school peers. Differences between parent and teacher appraisal of the cancer survivor underscore the importance of ongoing communication. Finally, the results indicate a possible relationship between cognitive and emotional problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-158
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pediatric Nursing
Volume3
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Survivors
Neoplasms
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Leukemia
Central Nervous System
Communication
Therapeutics
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

The late psychosocial consequences of childhood cancer. / Moore, Ida M; Glasser, Martin E.; Ablin, Arthur R.

In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 3, No. 3, 1988, p. 150-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moore, IM, Glasser, ME & Ablin, AR 1988, 'The late psychosocial consequences of childhood cancer', Journal of Pediatric Nursing, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 150-158.
Moore, Ida M ; Glasser, Martin E. ; Ablin, Arthur R. / The late psychosocial consequences of childhood cancer. In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 1988 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 150-158.
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