The life and death of a home: House history in a subsurface feature

Steven N. Archer, Kevin M. Bartoy, Charlotte L. Pearson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors take a high resolution multi-evidentiary approach to examine a single stratified feature from a seventeenth-century house lot in meticulous detail. In doing so, the possibility of interpreting detailed issues of site, structure and landscape are demonstrated; far beyond the capabilities of a standard, rote artifact analysis of the same feature. It is argued that in such contexts weighing alternative data categories, such as botanical and micromorphological evidence, equally with conventionally-recorded artifact and stratigraphic evidence, can yield detailed new lines of inquiry and far more rigorous interpretations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBetween Dirt and Discussion
Subtitle of host publicationMethods, Methodology, and Interpretation in Historical Archaeology
PublisherSpringer US
Pages81-113
Number of pages33
ISBN (Print)0387342184, 9780387342184
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Archaeobotany
  • Chesapeake
  • Historical archaeology
  • Landscape change
  • Methodology
  • Microstratigraphy
  • Paleoethnobotany
  • Phytoliths
  • Root cellars
  • Seventeenth century
  • Soil micromorphology
  • Stratigraphic analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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  • Cite this

    Archer, S. N., Bartoy, K. M., & Pearson, C. L. (2006). The life and death of a home: House history in a subsurface feature. In Between Dirt and Discussion: Methods, Methodology, and Interpretation in Historical Archaeology (pp. 81-113). Springer US. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-34219-1_5