The long-term health consequences of relationship violence in adulthood: An examination of low-income women from Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio

Terrence D. Hill, Ryan D. Schroeder, Christopher Bradley, Lauren M. Kaplan, Ronald J. Angel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the long-term health consequences of relationship violence in adulthood. Methods. Using data from the Welfare, Children, and Families project (1999 and 2001), a probability sample of 2402 low-income women with children living in disadvantaged neighborhoods in Boston, Massachusetts; Chicago, Illinois; and San Antonio, Texas, we predicted changes in the frequency of intoxication, psychological distress, and self-rated health over 2 years with baseline measures of relationship violence and a host of relevant background variables. Results. Our analyses showed that psychological aggression predicted increases in psychological distress, whereas minor physical assault and sexual coercion predicted increases in the frequency of intoxication. There was no evidence to suggest that relationship violence in adulthood predicted changes in self-rated health. Conclusions. Experiences with relationship violence beyond the formative and developmental years of childhood and adolescence can have far-reaching effects on the health status of disadvantaged urban women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1645-1650
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume99
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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