THE MISSISSAUGA TRAIN DERAILMENT AND EVACUATION, 10–16 NOVEMBER 1979

Diana M. Liverman, John P. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

The evacuation of a quarter of a million residents of the city of Mississauga, Ontario, in the aftermath of the derailment of a freight train carrying hazardous materials on 10 November 1979, was, at that time, the largest peacetime evacuation ever conducted in North America. It took place with little panic or injury, no deaths, and no apparent resistance to evacuation advice. Not surprisingly, then, the success of the Mississauga evacuation has attracted the interest, and raised the hopes, of emergency planners, governments, and industry officials in North America and many other countries. These groups want to understand the reasons for the success of the evacuation, and, if possible, to transfer the effective elements of the Mississauga emergency plans and response procedures to their own jurisdictions. Their concerns reflect the wider search for a model of public decision‐making under threat which would identify and link cirtical factors, decisions, and behaviour, and which would provide a framework for emergency planning and research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages365-375
Number of pages11
Volume25
No4
Specialist publicationCanadian Geographer / Le Géographe canadien
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1981
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Earth-Surface Processes

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