The modern evolution of geomorphology — Binghamton and personal perspectives, 1970–2019 and beyond

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Abstract

The annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposia (BGS) began in 1970, initiated by Professors Donald R. Coates and Marie Morisawa of the State University of New York at Binghamton. The 50 BGS meeting topics through 2019 can be organized into five general themes, as follows: (1) Applications; (2) Methods; (3) Process and Form; (4) History, Philosophy, and Theory; (5) Systems. My own geomorphological research can be divided among these themes, though it has not always been in tune with any prevailing paradigm. The experience of the BGS meetings suggests that the immediate future of geomorphology will follow current trends involving technological advances in such areas as geochronology, geospatial analysis, lidar mapping, computer simulation, and systems-based predictive modeling. For the longer term it may be that the research frontiers will lie in outer and inner space, with the former involving the discovery and analysis of the surfaces of Earth-like planets within and beyond our own solar system. The challenges of inner space may be even more profound as they are imposed against the background of rapidly accelerating advances in artificial intelligence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106684
JournalGeomorphology
Volume366
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Keywords

  • Geomorphology
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Processes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth-Surface Processes

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