The money blind

How to stop industry bias in biomedical science, without violating the first amendment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pharmaceutical and medical device industries use billions of dollars to support the biomedical science that physicians, regulators, and patients use to make healthcare decisions-the decisions that drive an increasingly large portion of the American economy. Compelling evidence suggests that this industry money buys favorable results, biasing the outcomes of scientific research. Current efforts to manage the problem, including disclosure mandates and peer reviews, are ineffective. A blinding mechanism, operating through an intermediary such as the National Institutes of Health, could instead be developed to allow industry support of science without allowing undue influence. If the editors of biomedical journals fail to mandate that industry finders utilize such a solution, the federal government has several regulatory levers available, including conditioning federal funding and direct regulation, both of which could be done without violating the First Amendment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-387
Number of pages30
JournalAmerican Journal of Law and Medicine
Volume37
Issue number2-3
StatePublished - 2011

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amendment
Industry
money
industry
trend
science
Federal Government
Peer Review
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Disclosure
peer review
conditioning
pharmaceutical
dollar
editor
funding
physician
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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