The near infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

Scott Horner, Marcia J Rieke

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The NIRCam science objectives are the detection and identification of "first light" objects, the study of star and brown dwarf formation, and the detection and characterization of planetary systems and their formation. These three science programs are also the key objectives of the JWST program as a whole. The NIRCam instrument design is optimized for these objectives within the mission constraints. NIRCam consists of two optics modules, each with a field of view of 2.2 arcmin square. The modules are identical except for the mechanical layout. Each module consists of two channels divided by a dichroic beamsplitter. The short wavelength channel has a band pass of 0.6 - 2. 3 microns, with pixels sized for Nyquist sampling of the PSF at 2.0 microns. The long wavelength channel has a band pass of 2.4 - 5.0 microns, with pixels sized for Nyquist sampling at 4.0 microns. Selections of wide (R~4), intermediate (R~10), and narrow (R~100) bandwidth filters are provided in each of the four channels, along with coronagraphic occulting masks and pupil stops. A refractive optical design results in a smaller instrument volume and mass, provides good images at the pupils for wavefront sensing and coronagraphy, allows good access to the pupils and focal planes, and relaxes the alignment requirements compared to a reflective design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsJ.C. Mather
Pages628-634
Number of pages7
Volume5487
EditionPART 2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
EventOptical, Infrared, and Millimeter Space Telecopes - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: Jun 21 2004Jun 25 2004

Other

OtherOptical, Infrared, and Millimeter Space Telecopes
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period6/21/046/25/04

Fingerprint

James Webb Space Telescope
Space telescopes
pupils
Cameras
cameras
Infrared radiation
modules
Pixels
Sampling
Wavelength
Optical design
pixels
sampling
Wavefronts
Stars
planetary systems
Masks
Optics
wavelengths
layouts

Keywords

  • Infrared
  • JWST
  • Space instruments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Horner, S., & Rieke, M. J. (2004). The near infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In J. C. Mather (Ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (PART 2 ed., Vol. 5487, pp. 628-634) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.552281

The near infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). / Horner, Scott; Rieke, Marcia J.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / J.C. Mather. Vol. 5487 PART 2. ed. 2004. p. 628-634.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Horner, S & Rieke, MJ 2004, The near infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). in JC Mather (ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. PART 2 edn, vol. 5487, pp. 628-634, Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Space Telecopes, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 6/21/04. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.552281
Horner S, Rieke MJ. The near infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In Mather JC, editor, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. PART 2 ed. Vol. 5487. 2004. p. 628-634 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.552281
Horner, Scott ; Rieke, Marcia J. / The near infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / J.C. Mather. Vol. 5487 PART 2. ed. 2004. pp. 628-634
@inproceedings{bf7e938ec9614085ab41fc753728053c,
title = "The near infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)",
abstract = "The NIRCam science objectives are the detection and identification of {"}first light{"} objects, the study of star and brown dwarf formation, and the detection and characterization of planetary systems and their formation. These three science programs are also the key objectives of the JWST program as a whole. The NIRCam instrument design is optimized for these objectives within the mission constraints. NIRCam consists of two optics modules, each with a field of view of 2.2 arcmin square. The modules are identical except for the mechanical layout. Each module consists of two channels divided by a dichroic beamsplitter. The short wavelength channel has a band pass of 0.6 - 2. 3 microns, with pixels sized for Nyquist sampling of the PSF at 2.0 microns. The long wavelength channel has a band pass of 2.4 - 5.0 microns, with pixels sized for Nyquist sampling at 4.0 microns. Selections of wide (R~4), intermediate (R~10), and narrow (R~100) bandwidth filters are provided in each of the four channels, along with coronagraphic occulting masks and pupil stops. A refractive optical design results in a smaller instrument volume and mass, provides good images at the pupils for wavefront sensing and coronagraphy, allows good access to the pupils and focal planes, and relaxes the alignment requirements compared to a reflective design.",
keywords = "Infrared, JWST, Space instruments",
author = "Scott Horner and Rieke, {Marcia J}",
year = "2004",
doi = "10.1117/12.552281",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5487",
pages = "628--634",
editor = "J.C. Mather",
booktitle = "Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering",
edition = "PART 2",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - The near infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

AU - Horner, Scott

AU - Rieke, Marcia J

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - The NIRCam science objectives are the detection and identification of "first light" objects, the study of star and brown dwarf formation, and the detection and characterization of planetary systems and their formation. These three science programs are also the key objectives of the JWST program as a whole. The NIRCam instrument design is optimized for these objectives within the mission constraints. NIRCam consists of two optics modules, each with a field of view of 2.2 arcmin square. The modules are identical except for the mechanical layout. Each module consists of two channels divided by a dichroic beamsplitter. The short wavelength channel has a band pass of 0.6 - 2. 3 microns, with pixels sized for Nyquist sampling of the PSF at 2.0 microns. The long wavelength channel has a band pass of 2.4 - 5.0 microns, with pixels sized for Nyquist sampling at 4.0 microns. Selections of wide (R~4), intermediate (R~10), and narrow (R~100) bandwidth filters are provided in each of the four channels, along with coronagraphic occulting masks and pupil stops. A refractive optical design results in a smaller instrument volume and mass, provides good images at the pupils for wavefront sensing and coronagraphy, allows good access to the pupils and focal planes, and relaxes the alignment requirements compared to a reflective design.

AB - The NIRCam science objectives are the detection and identification of "first light" objects, the study of star and brown dwarf formation, and the detection and characterization of planetary systems and their formation. These three science programs are also the key objectives of the JWST program as a whole. The NIRCam instrument design is optimized for these objectives within the mission constraints. NIRCam consists of two optics modules, each with a field of view of 2.2 arcmin square. The modules are identical except for the mechanical layout. Each module consists of two channels divided by a dichroic beamsplitter. The short wavelength channel has a band pass of 0.6 - 2. 3 microns, with pixels sized for Nyquist sampling of the PSF at 2.0 microns. The long wavelength channel has a band pass of 2.4 - 5.0 microns, with pixels sized for Nyquist sampling at 4.0 microns. Selections of wide (R~4), intermediate (R~10), and narrow (R~100) bandwidth filters are provided in each of the four channels, along with coronagraphic occulting masks and pupil stops. A refractive optical design results in a smaller instrument volume and mass, provides good images at the pupils for wavefront sensing and coronagraphy, allows good access to the pupils and focal planes, and relaxes the alignment requirements compared to a reflective design.

KW - Infrared

KW - JWST

KW - Space instruments

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=10044228566&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=10044228566&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1117/12.552281

DO - 10.1117/12.552281

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:10044228566

VL - 5487

SP - 628

EP - 634

BT - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

A2 - Mather, J.C.

ER -