The neural substrates of improved phonological processing following successful treatment in a case of phonological alexia and agraphia

Andrew T. DeMarco, Stephen M Wilson, Kindle Rising, Steven Z Rapcsak, Pelagie M Beeson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phonological deficits are common in aphasia after left-hemisphere stroke, and can have significant functional consequences for spoken and written language. While many individuals improve through treatment, the neural substrates supporting improvements are poorly understood. We measured brain activation during pseudoword reading in an individual through two treatment phases. Improvements were associated with greater activation in residual left dorsal language regions and bilateral regions supporting attention and effort. Gains were maintained, while activation returned to pre-treatment levels. This case demonstrates the neural support for improved phonology after damage to critical regions and that improvements may be maintained without markedly increased effort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalNeurocase
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 20 2018

Fingerprint

Agraphia
Dyslexia
Language
Aphasia
Reading
Therapeutics
Stroke
Brain
Substrate
Alexia
Phonological Processing
Activation

Keywords

  • acquired agraphia
  • Acquired alexia
  • aphasia
  • functional MRI
  • phonological impairment
  • rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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AU - Rising, Kindle

AU - Rapcsak, Steven Z

AU - Beeson, Pelagie M

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