The neurometabolic landscape of cognitive decline: In vivo studies with positron emission tomography in Alzheimer's disease

Pietro Pietrini, Gene E. Alexander, Maura L. Furey, Harald Hampel, Mario Guazzelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia in the elderly, is characterized by the progressive, global and irreversible deterioration of cognitive abilities. The development of positron emission tomography (PET) methodologies has made it possible to study the in vivo brain metabolic correlates of human cognitive and behavioral functions. Moreover, as PET scan examinations can be repeated, the progression of the neuropathological process and its relation to cognitive dysfunction can be followed over time. In an effort to understand the changes in neural function that precede and accompany onset of dementia and their relation to clinical manifestations, in the last several years, we have conducted clinical, neuropsychological and brain metabolic studies in groups of Alzheimer's disease patients at different stages of dementia severity or with distinct clinical pictures and in populations at risk for developing the disease. Here, we discuss the main findings and implications obtained from these studies. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-98
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brain metabolism
  • Cognition
  • Dementia
  • Early diagnosis
  • Human
  • Synaptic dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology (medical)

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