The neurotic employee: Theoretical analysis of the influence of narrow facets of neuroticism on cognitive, social, and behavioral processes relevant to job performance

Jerel E Slaughter, Edgar E. Kausel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this chapter, we argue that despite the fact that empirical research on trait neuroticism has shown fairly weak relations between the broad neuroticism trait and overall job performance, organizational research can benefit by increased attention to the neuroticism construct. This is because the influence of neuroticism on work behavior can be best understood by separating the more general neuroticism domain into its lower level facets. We discuss various conceptualizations of neuroticism and then review existing research on the relation between the facets of neuroticism and job performance. Next, we turn our attention to a theoretical framework that suggests that the relations between neuroticism facets and job performance outcomes are explained by the social, cognitive, and behavioral effects of having varying levels of neuroticism-based traits. In so doing, we not only focus on mediated relationships between facets of neuroticism and job performance dimensions but also recognize some important moderators, as well as some expected direct relations between the facets and job performance. Finally, we discuss implications for further conceptual development, offer some suggestions for testing the propositions, and discuss potential practical implications of finding support for this model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-341
Number of pages77
JournalResearch in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Theoretical analysis
Job performance
Employees
Neuroticism
Work behavior
Testing
Theoretical framework
Organizational research
Research benefits
Moderator
Empirical research
Conceptualization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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