The new 'burbs: the exurbs and their implications for planning policy

J. S. Davis, Arthur Christian Nelson, K. J. Dueker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The exurbs are currently home to 60m Americans, and may be home to more people than urban, suburban, or rural areas are by early in the next century. Planners may be unprepared to address the special needs and challenges presented by the exurbs, because the tools that planners use to manage cities, suburbs, and rural areas may be inappropriate. Before planners can respond adequately to the challenge of exurban development, they must first understand who lives there and why. Using a case study of the Portland, Oregon area, we find that although exurbanites have many socio-economic characteristics in common with suburbanites, they prefer a different lifestyle. This lifestyle includes rural amenities, large house lots, and longer drives to work. We also find substantial differences between exurbanites living in small towns and those living in rural areas. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJournal - American Planning Association
Pages45-59
Number of pages15
Volume60
Edition1
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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rural area
lifestyle
suburban area
small town
amenity
policy
planning
need
city
suburb
socioeconomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Davis, J. S., Nelson, A. C., & Dueker, K. J. (1994). The new 'burbs: the exurbs and their implications for planning policy. In Journal - American Planning Association (1 ed., Vol. 60, pp. 45-59)

The new 'burbs : the exurbs and their implications for planning policy. / Davis, J. S.; Nelson, Arthur Christian; Dueker, K. J.

Journal - American Planning Association. Vol. 60 1. ed. 1994. p. 45-59.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Davis, JS, Nelson, AC & Dueker, KJ 1994, The new 'burbs: the exurbs and their implications for planning policy. in Journal - American Planning Association. 1 edn, vol. 60, pp. 45-59.
Davis JS, Nelson AC, Dueker KJ. The new 'burbs: the exurbs and their implications for planning policy. In Journal - American Planning Association. 1 ed. Vol. 60. 1994. p. 45-59
Davis, J. S. ; Nelson, Arthur Christian ; Dueker, K. J. / The new 'burbs : the exurbs and their implications for planning policy. Journal - American Planning Association. Vol. 60 1. ed. 1994. pp. 45-59
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