The new consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care-cardiocerebral resuscitation

Karl B. Kern, Sergio Timerman, José Antônio Franchini Ramires

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

This article reviews research showing that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as it has been practiced and as it is currently taught and advocated is far from optimal. Cardiocerebral resuscitation (CCR) is a new approach to patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest that has been shown to improve rates of neurologically intact survival, aided by emergency medical services (EMS) systems. CCR comprises three major components: continuous chest compressions (CCCs) without mouth-to-mouth ventilation, which can be performed by bystanders who witness cardiac arrests or by the first members of the EMS team to reach the scene; a new advanced cardiac life support algorithm; and the establishment of cardiac arrest centers that can provide optimal care, including urgent cardiac catheterization, controlled mild therapeutic hypothermia, and standardized supportive care for patients in comas after resuscitation from cardiac arrest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-38
Number of pages4
JournalUS Cardiology
Volume8
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Cardiocerebral resuscitation
  • Continuous chest compressions
  • Continuous oxygen insufflation
  • Hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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