The North American Monsoon Model Assessment Project: Integrating numerical modeling into a field-based process study

David S. Gutzler, H. K. Kim, R. W. Higgins, H. M H Juang, M. Kanamitsu, K. Mitchell, K. Mo, P. Pegion, Elizabeth A Ritchie, J. K. Schemm, S. Schubert, Y. Song, R. Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The international North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) was organized to improve understanding and prediction skill of warm-season precipitation fluctuations in the monsoonal region of southwest North America. Needing to improve its numerical simulation for the monsoon circulation and its large-scale effects, NAME organizers came up with the NAME Model Assessment Project or NAMAP, which is designed to evaluate the warm-season climate modeling before the field campaign and to provide benchmark simulations of warm-season precipitation, and the physical processes that control precipitation. NAMAP was also designed to assess a wide range of dynamical models with different spatial and temporal resolutions, computational domains, and physical parameterizations. The resultant NAMAP analysis includes discussion of monthly mean precipitation, temperature, low-level wind, and surface flux fields, archived to preserve the monthly mean diurnal cycle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1423-1429
Number of pages7
JournalBulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Volume86
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005
Externally publishedYes

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project assessment
monsoon
modeling
experiment
scale effect
surface flux
simulation
climate modeling
parameterization
prediction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

The North American Monsoon Model Assessment Project : Integrating numerical modeling into a field-based process study. / Gutzler, David S.; Kim, H. K.; Higgins, R. W.; Juang, H. M H; Kanamitsu, M.; Mitchell, K.; Mo, K.; Pegion, P.; Ritchie, Elizabeth A; Schemm, J. K.; Schubert, S.; Song, Y.; Yang, R.

In: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Vol. 86, No. 10, 10.2005, p. 1423-1429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gutzler, DS, Kim, HK, Higgins, RW, Juang, HMH, Kanamitsu, M, Mitchell, K, Mo, K, Pegion, P, Ritchie, EA, Schemm, JK, Schubert, S, Song, Y & Yang, R 2005, 'The North American Monsoon Model Assessment Project: Integrating numerical modeling into a field-based process study', Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, vol. 86, no. 10, pp. 1423-1429. https://doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-86-10-1423
Gutzler, David S. ; Kim, H. K. ; Higgins, R. W. ; Juang, H. M H ; Kanamitsu, M. ; Mitchell, K. ; Mo, K. ; Pegion, P. ; Ritchie, Elizabeth A ; Schemm, J. K. ; Schubert, S. ; Song, Y. ; Yang, R. / The North American Monsoon Model Assessment Project : Integrating numerical modeling into a field-based process study. In: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 2005 ; Vol. 86, No. 10. pp. 1423-1429.
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