The object of affection: Subjectivity uncertainty increases objectification in close relationships

Lucas A. Keefer, Mark J. Landau, Daniel L Sullivan, Zachary K. Rothschild

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research shows that people objectify strangers when led to feel uncertain about their ability to positively relate to those targets-termed subjectivity uncertainty. The current research goes further to examine whether, in the context of close relationships, subjectivity uncertainty causes people to adopt simplified perceptions of a relationship partner. Participants primed with subjectivity uncertainty about a relationship partner objectified that person more than participants primed with uncertainty about non-subjective aspects of their relationship (Study 1), subjectivity uncertainty about a different target (Study 2), or negative feelings about the relationship (Study 3). Mediation analyses showed that felt subjectivity uncertainty motivated these simplified perceptions (Studies 1 and 2) and that they are not the result of disliking the target (Study 3). These findings suggest that a desire to establish close relationships, coupled with uncertainty about one's ability to do so, may ironically motivate people to objectify close others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-504
Number of pages21
JournalSocial Cognition
Volume32
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2014

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Uncertainty
Aptitude
Research
Emotions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The object of affection : Subjectivity uncertainty increases objectification in close relationships. / Keefer, Lucas A.; Landau, Mark J.; Sullivan, Daniel L; Rothschild, Zachary K.

In: Social Cognition, Vol. 32, No. 5, 2014, p. 484-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keefer, Lucas A. ; Landau, Mark J. ; Sullivan, Daniel L ; Rothschild, Zachary K. / The object of affection : Subjectivity uncertainty increases objectification in close relationships. In: Social Cognition. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 5. pp. 484-504.
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