The optimal anatomic sites for sampling heterosexual men for human papillomavirus (HPV) detection: The HPV detection in men study

Anna R. Giuliano, Carrie M. Nielson, Roberto Flores, Eileen F. Dunne, Martha Abrahamsen, Mary R. Papenfuss, Lauri E. Markowitz, Danelle Smith, Robin B Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men contributes to infection and cervical disease in women as well as to disease in men. This study aimed to determine the optimal anatomic site(s) for HPV detection in heterosexual men. Methods. A cross-sectional study of HPV infection was conducted in 463 men from 2003 to 2006. Urethral, glans penis/coronal sulcus, penile shaft/prepuce, scrotal, perianal, anal canal, semen, and urine samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for sample adequacy and HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction and genotyping. To determine the optimal sites for estimating HPV prevalence, site-specific prevalences were calculated and compared with the overall prevalence. Sites and combinations of sites were excluded until a recalculated prevalence was reduced by <5% from the overall prevalence. Results. The overall prevalence of HPV was 65.4%. HPV detection was highest at the penile shaft (49.9% for the full cohort and 47.9% for the subcohort of men with complete sampling), followed by the glans penis/coronal sulcus (35.8% and 32.8%) and scrotum (34.2% and 32.8%). Detection was lowest in urethra (10.1% and 10.2%) and semen (5.3% and 4.8%) samples. Exclusion of urethra, semen, and either perianal, scrotal, or anal samples resulted in a <5% reduction in prevalence. Conclusions. At a minimum, the penile shaft and the glans penis/coronal sulcus should be sampled in heterosexual men. A scrotal, perianal, or anal sample should also be included for optimal HPV detection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1146-1152
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume196
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

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Heterosexuality
Penis
Semen
Papillomavirus Infections
Urethra
Scrotum
Anal Canal
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Cross-Sectional Studies
Urine
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

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The optimal anatomic sites for sampling heterosexual men for human papillomavirus (HPV) detection : The HPV detection in men study. / Giuliano, Anna R.; Nielson, Carrie M.; Flores, Roberto; Dunne, Eileen F.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Smith, Danelle; Harris, Robin B.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 196, No. 8, 2007, p. 1146-1152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Giuliano, AR, Nielson, CM, Flores, R, Dunne, EF, Abrahamsen, M, Papenfuss, MR, Markowitz, LE, Smith, D & Harris, RB 2007, 'The optimal anatomic sites for sampling heterosexual men for human papillomavirus (HPV) detection: The HPV detection in men study', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 196, no. 8, pp. 1146-1152. https://doi.org/10.1086/521629
Giuliano, Anna R. ; Nielson, Carrie M. ; Flores, Roberto ; Dunne, Eileen F. ; Abrahamsen, Martha ; Papenfuss, Mary R. ; Markowitz, Lauri E. ; Smith, Danelle ; Harris, Robin B. / The optimal anatomic sites for sampling heterosexual men for human papillomavirus (HPV) detection : The HPV detection in men study. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2007 ; Vol. 196, No. 8. pp. 1146-1152.
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abstract = "Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men contributes to infection and cervical disease in women as well as to disease in men. This study aimed to determine the optimal anatomic site(s) for HPV detection in heterosexual men. Methods. A cross-sectional study of HPV infection was conducted in 463 men from 2003 to 2006. Urethral, glans penis/coronal sulcus, penile shaft/prepuce, scrotal, perianal, anal canal, semen, and urine samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for sample adequacy and HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction and genotyping. To determine the optimal sites for estimating HPV prevalence, site-specific prevalences were calculated and compared with the overall prevalence. Sites and combinations of sites were excluded until a recalculated prevalence was reduced by <5{\%} from the overall prevalence. Results. The overall prevalence of HPV was 65.4{\%}. HPV detection was highest at the penile shaft (49.9{\%} for the full cohort and 47.9{\%} for the subcohort of men with complete sampling), followed by the glans penis/coronal sulcus (35.8{\%} and 32.8{\%}) and scrotum (34.2{\%} and 32.8{\%}). Detection was lowest in urethra (10.1{\%} and 10.2{\%}) and semen (5.3{\%} and 4.8{\%}) samples. Exclusion of urethra, semen, and either perianal, scrotal, or anal samples resulted in a <5{\%} reduction in prevalence. Conclusions. At a minimum, the penile shaft and the glans penis/coronal sulcus should be sampled in heterosexual men. A scrotal, perianal, or anal sample should also be included for optimal HPV detection.",
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AU - Giuliano, Anna R.

AU - Nielson, Carrie M.

AU - Flores, Roberto

AU - Dunne, Eileen F.

AU - Abrahamsen, Martha

AU - Papenfuss, Mary R.

AU - Markowitz, Lauri E.

AU - Smith, Danelle

AU - Harris, Robin B

PY - 2007

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N2 - Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men contributes to infection and cervical disease in women as well as to disease in men. This study aimed to determine the optimal anatomic site(s) for HPV detection in heterosexual men. Methods. A cross-sectional study of HPV infection was conducted in 463 men from 2003 to 2006. Urethral, glans penis/coronal sulcus, penile shaft/prepuce, scrotal, perianal, anal canal, semen, and urine samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for sample adequacy and HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction and genotyping. To determine the optimal sites for estimating HPV prevalence, site-specific prevalences were calculated and compared with the overall prevalence. Sites and combinations of sites were excluded until a recalculated prevalence was reduced by <5% from the overall prevalence. Results. The overall prevalence of HPV was 65.4%. HPV detection was highest at the penile shaft (49.9% for the full cohort and 47.9% for the subcohort of men with complete sampling), followed by the glans penis/coronal sulcus (35.8% and 32.8%) and scrotum (34.2% and 32.8%). Detection was lowest in urethra (10.1% and 10.2%) and semen (5.3% and 4.8%) samples. Exclusion of urethra, semen, and either perianal, scrotal, or anal samples resulted in a <5% reduction in prevalence. Conclusions. At a minimum, the penile shaft and the glans penis/coronal sulcus should be sampled in heterosexual men. A scrotal, perianal, or anal sample should also be included for optimal HPV detection.

AB - Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men contributes to infection and cervical disease in women as well as to disease in men. This study aimed to determine the optimal anatomic site(s) for HPV detection in heterosexual men. Methods. A cross-sectional study of HPV infection was conducted in 463 men from 2003 to 2006. Urethral, glans penis/coronal sulcus, penile shaft/prepuce, scrotal, perianal, anal canal, semen, and urine samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for sample adequacy and HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction and genotyping. To determine the optimal sites for estimating HPV prevalence, site-specific prevalences were calculated and compared with the overall prevalence. Sites and combinations of sites were excluded until a recalculated prevalence was reduced by <5% from the overall prevalence. Results. The overall prevalence of HPV was 65.4%. HPV detection was highest at the penile shaft (49.9% for the full cohort and 47.9% for the subcohort of men with complete sampling), followed by the glans penis/coronal sulcus (35.8% and 32.8%) and scrotum (34.2% and 32.8%). Detection was lowest in urethra (10.1% and 10.2%) and semen (5.3% and 4.8%) samples. Exclusion of urethra, semen, and either perianal, scrotal, or anal samples resulted in a <5% reduction in prevalence. Conclusions. At a minimum, the penile shaft and the glans penis/coronal sulcus should be sampled in heterosexual men. A scrotal, perianal, or anal sample should also be included for optimal HPV detection.

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