The origins of the great pandemic

Michael Worobey, Jim Cox, Douglas Gill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The timing and location of the first cases of the 1918 influenza pandemic are still controversial, a century after the pandemic became widely recognized. Here, we critically review competing hypotheses on the timing and geographical origin of this important outbreak and provide new historical insights into debates within military circles as to the nature of putative pre-1918 influenza activity. We also synthesize current knowledge about why the 1918 pandemic was so intense in young adults. Although it is still not clear precisely when and where the outbreak began and symptom-based reports are unlikely to reveal the answer, indirect methods including phylogenetics provide important clues, and we consider whether intense influenza activity as far back as 1915 in the USA may have been caused by viral strains closely related to the 1918 one.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-25
Number of pages8
JournalEvolution, Medicine and Public Health
Volume2019
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 21 2019

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influenza
Pandemics
pandemic
Human Influenza
Disease Outbreaks
young adults
Young Adult
phylogenetics
phylogeny
methodology

Keywords

  • 1918
  • geography
  • influenza
  • origin
  • pandemic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

The origins of the great pandemic. / Worobey, Michael; Cox, Jim; Gill, Douglas.

In: Evolution, Medicine and Public Health, Vol. 2019, No. 1, 21.01.2019, p. 18-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Worobey, Michael ; Cox, Jim ; Gill, Douglas. / The origins of the great pandemic. In: Evolution, Medicine and Public Health. 2019 ; Vol. 2019, No. 1. pp. 18-25.
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