The Outcomes of Broadcasting Self-Disclosure Using New Communication Technologies: Responses to Disclosure Vary Across One’s Social Network

Stephen A Rains, Steven R. Brunner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several new communication technologies have made it relatively easy for individuals to broadcast a single self-disclosure directly to almost everyone with whom they share a relationship—ranging from close friends to little-known acquaintances. Drawing from research on self-disclosure and the negativity effect, two studies were conducted to test the notion that the interpersonal and relational outcomes of broadcasting positive and negative self-disclosures are not uniform. The results of the cross-sectional survey offer evidence that the outcomes of positive and negative broadcasted disclosures vary depending on the receiver’s relationship with the discloser. The results from the experiment largely support the negativity effect explanation for differences in the outcomes of broadcasted disclosures. Relative to positive disclosures, negative broadcasted self-disclosures have a significantly greater impact on acquaintances than on friends’ perceptions of the discloser and their relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)659-687
Number of pages29
JournalCommunication Research
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

Keywords

  • communication technology
  • negativity effect
  • self-disclosure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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