The parasitophorous vacuole membrane surrounding Plasmodium and Toxoplasma: An unusual compartment in infected cells

Klaus Lingelbach, Keith A. Joiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

213 Scopus citations

Abstract

Plasmodium and Toxoplasma belong to a group of unicellular parasites which actively penetrate their respective mammalian host cells. During the process of invasion, they initiate the formation of a membrane, the so-called parasitophorous vacuolar membrane, which surrounds the intracellular parasite and which differs substantially from endosomal membranes or the membrane of phagolysosomes. The biogenesis and the maintenance of the vacuolar membrane are closely related to the peculiar cellular organization of these parasites and are unique phenomena in cell biology. Here we compare biological similarities and differences between the two parasites, with respect to: (i) the formation, (ii) the maintenance, and (iii) the biological role of the vacuolar membrane. We conclude that most differences between the organisms primarily reflect the different biosynthetic capacities of the host cells they invade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1467-1475
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cell Science
Volume111
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jul 8 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Host cell invasion
  • Membrane biogenesis
  • Parasitophorous vacuole
  • Plasmodium
  • Toxoplasma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

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