The patient experience of treatment for hepatitis C

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study has used qualitative hermeneutics to explore the patient's experience of treatment for hepatitis C. Hepatitis C treatment may pose numerous physical and emotional challenges. There is a need to understand the experience from a holistic nursing perspective in order to facilitate the patient's well-being. Individuals undergoing combination treatment for hepatitis C participated in a hermeneutic dialogue, which provided the investigators with an emic perspective. Dialogue content, reflection, and preunderstanding were hermeneutically analyzed. Similar treatment experiences elicited four common emotions (sadness, anger, fear, and frustration). Analyzing the similar experiences led to two emerging themes: (1) "That is not who I am," connoted by rejecting the notion of being a "typicalg" patient, seeing treatment as not so bad, being "differentg" during treatment, and feeling abandoned because of treatment; and (2) "looking beyond the experienceg" was noted by looking for faith beyond traditional healthcare and looking for understanding. The hepatitis C treatment experience was seen as a process: having a start, a middle, and an end, without being all-consuming. Implications for holistic nursing care are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-315
Number of pages7
JournalGastroenterology Nursing
Volume29
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C
Holistic Nursing
Therapeutics
Emotions
Frustration
Anger
Nursing Care
Fear
Research Personnel
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

The patient experience of treatment for hepatitis C. / Sheppard, Kate Goggin; Hubbert, Ann.

In: Gastroenterology Nursing, Vol. 29, No. 4, 07.2006, p. 309-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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