The people’s right to know: Comparing Harold L. Cross’ pre-FOIA world to post-FOIA today

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Journalists and politicians often disagree over whether the state of freedom of information is better or worse since the passage of the Freedom of Information Act in 1966. This study attempts to provide some historical context by comparing the state of access in 1953 as outlined in detail in The People’s Right to Know by Harold L. Cross, the first comprehensive review of case law and statutes in the United States regarding access to public records at local, state and federal agencies. Analysis indicates that the legal right to information, particularly for police records and federal documents, is better today than it was in 1953, but challenges persist regarding compliance, enforcement and the prevalence of exemptions. Recommendations are provided for the next fifty years, including renewal of Cross’ urging for a First Amendment right to know.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-463
Number of pages31
JournalCommunication Law and Policy
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The people’s right to know: Comparing Harold L. Cross’ pre-FOIA world to post-FOIA today'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this