The 'peptidome' of tumour-derived chaperone-rich cell lysate anti-cancer vaccines reveals potential tumour antigens that stimulate tumour immunity

Michael W. Graner, Angela Romanoski, Emmanuel Katsanis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Tumour-derived chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) when isolated from tumour tissue or when embedded with peptide antigens is a potent anti-cancer vaccine consisting of numerous chaperone/heat shock proteins, including the highly immunogenic Hsp70, Hsp90, glucose regulated protein 94, and calreticulin. We have previously documented that CRCL provides both a source of tumour antigens and danger signals triggering antigen presenting cell activation. In this report we describe the 'peptidome' of potential antigens extracted from CRCL prepared from a murine tumour. Using mass spectrometry techniques we identify almost 60 different proteins of origin for the CRCL peptides; we determine that the parental proteins come from essentially all parts of the cell, and are involved in a broad range of functions. Further in silico analysis demonstrates that the parental proteins are components of major signalling networks of vital importance for cancer cell survival, proliferation, and migration. In many instances the peptides identified possess amino acid sequences that would allow their putative binding and display by murine major histocompatibility complex class I and II molecules, and there are also predicted binding motifs for Hsp70-type chaperones. By mixing fractionated pools of peptides with antigen-free (normal liver) CRCL, we were able to reconstitute effective anti-tumour activity of the vaccine, showing that the peptides are indeed the major purveyors of CRCL vaccines' efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-389
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Hyperthermia
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Cancer vaccine
  • Heat shock proteins
  • Peptide antigens
  • Tumour immunity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cancer Research

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