The Phenotypic, Psychological, and Social Interplays of Skin Color and Developmental Outcomes among Mexican-origin Adolescents: Dismantling Systems of Racism and Oppression during Adolescence

Jun Wang, Jinjin Yan, Kayla Osman, Xin Li, Katharine H. Zeiders, Yishan Shen, Melissa Victory, Su Yeong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Mexican-origin children from immigrant families are impacted by various systemic oppressions in life. The study seeks to examine how adolescents’ developmental outcomes are associated with specific phenotypic, psychological, and social features of skin color, as manifested by skin tone, skin color satisfaction, and foreigner stress. By taking a holistic approach, we examine both positive and negative adjustment outcomes, including delinquency, resilience, and effortful control. Participants were 604 Mexican-origin adolescents aged between 11.08 and 15.29 (Mage = 12.91, SD = 0.92) with at least one immigrant parent. The findings highlight the harm of foreigner stress and the benefit of skin color satisfaction in Mexican-origin adolescents’ development of delinquency, resilience, and effortful control, especially for those with a darker skin color.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • delinquency
  • effortful control
  • resilience
  • skin color

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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