The phonology of epenthetic stops: Implications for the phonetics-phonology interface in optimality theory

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents an OT analysis of stop epenthesis, which as well as reflecting the basic pattern of stop insertion can also model the available quantitative data on variability of stop epenthesis and the phonetic difference between epenthetic and underlying stops. However, accounting for these factors requires the introduction of two very powerful mechanisms within OT, absolute ranking with noise added to rankings at evaluation time (Boersma 1998), and allowing the phonetic realization access to the underlying representation. Such a powerful theory may not be desirable, but this need for very powerful mechanisms to model quantitative data is probably not restricted to OT. Using this example, this article examines the relationship between phonetics and phonology in OT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-27
Number of pages27
JournalLinguistics
Volume40
Issue number377
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

phonology
phonetics
ranking
evaluation
Optimality Theory
Ranking
Phonology
Epenthesis
Phonetics-phonology Interface
Evaluation
Insertion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

The phonology of epenthetic stops : Implications for the phonetics-phonology interface in optimality theory. / Warner, Natasha.

In: Linguistics, Vol. 40, No. 377, 2002, p. 1-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{140de9dbf8d14c40be99bbcc30d689c5,
title = "The phonology of epenthetic stops: Implications for the phonetics-phonology interface in optimality theory",
abstract = "This paper presents an OT analysis of stop epenthesis, which as well as reflecting the basic pattern of stop insertion can also model the available quantitative data on variability of stop epenthesis and the phonetic difference between epenthetic and underlying stops. However, accounting for these factors requires the introduction of two very powerful mechanisms within OT, absolute ranking with noise added to rankings at evaluation time (Boersma 1998), and allowing the phonetic realization access to the underlying representation. Such a powerful theory may not be desirable, but this need for very powerful mechanisms to model quantitative data is probably not restricted to OT. Using this example, this article examines the relationship between phonetics and phonology in OT.",
author = "Natasha Warner",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "1--27",
journal = "Linguistics",
issn = "0024-3949",
publisher = "Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG",
number = "377",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The phonology of epenthetic stops

T2 - Implications for the phonetics-phonology interface in optimality theory

AU - Warner, Natasha

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - This paper presents an OT analysis of stop epenthesis, which as well as reflecting the basic pattern of stop insertion can also model the available quantitative data on variability of stop epenthesis and the phonetic difference between epenthetic and underlying stops. However, accounting for these factors requires the introduction of two very powerful mechanisms within OT, absolute ranking with noise added to rankings at evaluation time (Boersma 1998), and allowing the phonetic realization access to the underlying representation. Such a powerful theory may not be desirable, but this need for very powerful mechanisms to model quantitative data is probably not restricted to OT. Using this example, this article examines the relationship between phonetics and phonology in OT.

AB - This paper presents an OT analysis of stop epenthesis, which as well as reflecting the basic pattern of stop insertion can also model the available quantitative data on variability of stop epenthesis and the phonetic difference between epenthetic and underlying stops. However, accounting for these factors requires the introduction of two very powerful mechanisms within OT, absolute ranking with noise added to rankings at evaluation time (Boersma 1998), and allowing the phonetic realization access to the underlying representation. Such a powerful theory may not be desirable, but this need for very powerful mechanisms to model quantitative data is probably not restricted to OT. Using this example, this article examines the relationship between phonetics and phonology in OT.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0039490188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0039490188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0039490188

VL - 40

SP - 1

EP - 27

JO - Linguistics

JF - Linguistics

SN - 0024-3949

IS - 377

ER -