The prevalence and correlates of rose questionnaire angina among women and men in the lipid research clinics program prevalence study population

Timothy Wilcosky, Robin B Harris, Lisa Weissfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence and correlates of Rose Questionnaire angina were investigated in a sample of 4,661 white women and men aged 30 years and above who participated in the Lipid Research Clinics Program Prevalence Study 1972-1976. Among men, the prevalence of Rose angina increased with age from about 1% to 12%, While the prevalence among women ranged from about 3% to 6%. Young women compared with men also had a relatively high prevalence of dyspnea, which was strongly correlated with Rose angina in both sexes. For women and men younger than 50 years, the dyspnea-Rose angina odds ratio was about 6(p <0.001), while older women and men had somewhat lower and higher odds ratios, respectively. Major and minor resting electrocardiographic abnormalities and self-reported history of a heart attack were not significantly associated with Rose angina among young participants of either sex, but they did show positive associations among older participants with the exception of minor electrocardio graphic abnormalities in men. A logistic regression analysis revealed a strong inverse association between high density lipoprotein cholesterol and Rose angina in both sexes. Because mortality studies consistently show an excess of coronary heart disease death among young men compared with women, the female excess of Rose angina at young ages suggests that the grouping of angina and myocar dial infarction into a single endpoint in cardiovascular disease studies may be more appropriate for young men than for young women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)400-409
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume125
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cross-Sectional Studies
Lipids
Research
Population
Dyspnea
Odds Ratio
Surveys and Questionnaires
Infarction
HDL Cholesterol
Coronary Disease
Cardiovascular Diseases
Logistic Models
Myocardial Infarction
Regression Analysis
Mortality

Keywords

  • Angina pectoris
  • Coronary disease
  • Dyspnea
  • Heart diseases
  • Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

The prevalence and correlates of rose questionnaire angina among women and men in the lipid research clinics program prevalence study population. / Wilcosky, Timothy; Harris, Robin B; Weissfeld, Lisa.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 125, No. 3, 03.1987, p. 400-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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