The PVC technique - A method to estimate the dissipation length scale in turbulent flows

Chih Ming Ho, Yitshak Zohar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A time-averaged length scale can be defined by a pair of successive turbulent-velocity derivatives, i.e. [dnu(x)/dxn]′/[dn+1u(x)/dx n+1]′. The length scale associated with the zeroth- and the first-order derivatives, u′/u′x, is the Taylor microscale. In isotropic turbulence, this scale is the average length between zero crossings of the velocity signal. The average length between zero crossings of the first velocity derivative, i.e. u′x/u′xx, can be reliably obtained by using the peak-valley-counting (PVC) technique. We have found that the most probable scale, rather than the average, equals the wavelength at the peak of the dissipation spectrum in a plane mixing layer (Zohar & Ho 1996). In this study, we experimentally investigate the generality of applying the PVC technique to estimate the dissipation scale in three basic turbulent shear flows: a flat-plate boundary layer, a wake behind a two-dimensional cylinder and a plane mixing layer. We also analytically explore the quantitative relationships among this length scale and the Kolmogorov and Taylor microscales.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-159
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Fluid Mechanics
Volume352
StatePublished - Dec 10 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

turbulent flow
Turbulent flow
valleys
counting
dissipation
Derivatives
estimates
roots of equations
Shear flow
microbalances
Boundary layers
Turbulence
Wavelength
isotropic turbulence
flat plates
shear flow
wakes
boundary layers
wavelengths

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

The PVC technique - A method to estimate the dissipation length scale in turbulent flows. / Ho, Chih Ming; Zohar, Yitshak.

In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 352, 10.12.1997, p. 135-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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