The relationship between bone,,hemopoietic stem cells,and vasculature

Sarah L. Ellis, Jochen Grassinger, Allan Jones, Judy Borg, Todd D Camenisch, David Haylock, Ivan Bertoncello, Susan K. Nilsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A large body of evidence suggests hemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exist in an endosteal niche close to bone, whereas others suggest that the HSC niche is intimately associated with vasculature. In this study, we show that transplanted hemopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) home preferentially to the trabecular-rich metaphysis of the femurs in nonablated mice at all time points from 15 minutes to 15 hours after transplantation. Within this region, they exist in an endosteal niche in close association with blood vessels. The preferential homing of HSPCs to the metaphysis occurs rapidly after transplantation, suggesting that blood vessels within this region may express a unique repertoire of endothelial adhesive molecules. One candidate is hyaluronan (HA), which is highly expressed on the blood vessel endothelium in the metaphysis. Analysis of the early stages of homing and the spatial distribution of transplanted HSPCs at the single-cell level in mice devoid of Has3-synthesized HA, provides evidence for a previously undescribed role for HA expressed on endothelial cells in directing the homing of HSPCs to the metaphysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1516-1524
Number of pages9
JournalBlood
Volume118
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 11 2011

Fingerprint

Blood vessels
Hyaluronic Acid
Stem cells
Bone
Stem Cells
Bone and Bones
Endothelial cells
Spatial distribution
Blood Vessels
Adhesives
Molecules
Transplantation
Stem Cell Niche
Femur
Endothelium
Endothelial Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Ellis, S. L., Grassinger, J., Jones, A., Borg, J., Camenisch, T. D., Haylock, D., ... Nilsson, S. K. (2011). The relationship between bone,,hemopoietic stem cells,and vasculature. Blood, 118(6), 1516-1524. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2010-08-303800

The relationship between bone,,hemopoietic stem cells,and vasculature. / Ellis, Sarah L.; Grassinger, Jochen; Jones, Allan; Borg, Judy; Camenisch, Todd D; Haylock, David; Bertoncello, Ivan; Nilsson, Susan K.

In: Blood, Vol. 118, No. 6, 11.08.2011, p. 1516-1524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ellis, SL, Grassinger, J, Jones, A, Borg, J, Camenisch, TD, Haylock, D, Bertoncello, I & Nilsson, SK 2011, 'The relationship between bone,,hemopoietic stem cells,and vasculature', Blood, vol. 118, no. 6, pp. 1516-1524. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2010-08-303800
Ellis SL, Grassinger J, Jones A, Borg J, Camenisch TD, Haylock D et al. The relationship between bone,,hemopoietic stem cells,and vasculature. Blood. 2011 Aug 11;118(6):1516-1524. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2010-08-303800
Ellis, Sarah L. ; Grassinger, Jochen ; Jones, Allan ; Borg, Judy ; Camenisch, Todd D ; Haylock, David ; Bertoncello, Ivan ; Nilsson, Susan K. / The relationship between bone,,hemopoietic stem cells,and vasculature. In: Blood. 2011 ; Vol. 118, No. 6. pp. 1516-1524.
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