The Relationship Between Health-Related Quality of Life and Saliva C-Reactive Protein and Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm in Latina Breast Cancer Survivors and Their Informal Caregivers: A Pilot Study

Thaddeus W.W. Pace, Terry A. Badger, Chris Segrin, Alla Sikorskii, Tracy E. Crane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: To date, no study has explored associations between objective stress-related biomarkers (i.e., inflammatory markers, diurnal rhythm of cortisol) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in Latina breast cancer survivors and their informal caregivers (i.e., family, friends). Method: This cross-sectional feasibility study assessed saliva C-reactive protein, saliva diurnal cortisol rhythm (cortisol slope), and self-reported HRQOL (psychological, physical, and social domains) in 22 Latina survivor–caregiver dyads. Feasibility was defined as ≥85% samples collected over 2 days (on waking, in afternoon, and in evening). Associations between biomarkers and HRQOL were examined with correlational analyses. Results: Collection of saliva was feasible. Strongest associations were observed between survivor evening cortisol (as well as cortisol slope) and fatigue, a component of physical HRQOL. Discussion: Associations presented may help promote investigations of mechanisms linking stress-related biomarkers and HRQOL in Latina breast cancer survivor–caregiver dyads, which will facilitate development of culturally congruent interventions for this underserved group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-335
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Transcultural Nursing
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Latinas
  • biomarkers
  • breast cancer survivors
  • cortisol
  • health-related quality of life
  • inflammation
  • informal caregivers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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