The Relationship Between Health-Related Quality of Life and Saliva C-Reactive Protein and Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm in Latina Breast Cancer Survivors and Their Informal Caregivers: A Pilot Study

Thaddeus W.W. Pace, Terry A. Badger, Chris Segrin, Alla Sikorskii, Tracy E. Crane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: To date, no study has explored associations between objective stress-related biomarkers (i.e., inflammatory markers, diurnal rhythm of cortisol) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in Latina breast cancer survivors and their informal caregivers (i.e., family, friends). Method: This cross-sectional feasibility study assessed saliva C-reactive protein, saliva diurnal cortisol rhythm (cortisol slope), and self-reported HRQOL (psychological, physical, and social domains) in 22 Latina survivor–caregiver dyads. Feasibility was defined as ≥85% samples collected over 2 days (on waking, in afternoon, and in evening). Associations between biomarkers and HRQOL were examined with correlational analyses. Results: Collection of saliva was feasible. Strongest associations were observed between survivor evening cortisol (as well as cortisol slope) and fatigue, a component of physical HRQOL. Discussion: Associations presented may help promote investigations of mechanisms linking stress-related biomarkers and HRQOL in Latina breast cancer survivor–caregiver dyads, which will facilitate development of culturally congruent interventions for this underserved group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Transcultural Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Latinas
  • biomarkers
  • breast cancer survivors
  • cortisol
  • health-related quality of life
  • inflammation
  • informal caregivers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Relationship Between Health-Related Quality of Life and Saliva C-Reactive Protein and Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm in Latina Breast Cancer Survivors and Their Informal Caregivers: A Pilot Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this