The Rise of Twitter in the Political Campaign: Searching for Intermedia Agenda-Setting Effects in the Presidential Primary

Bethany A. Conway, Kate M Kenski, Di Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Questions exist over the extent to which social media content may bypass, follow, or attract the attention of traditional media. This study sheds light on such dynamics by examining intermedia agenda-setting effects among the Twitter feeds of the 2012 presidential primary candidates, Twitter feeds of the Republican and Democratic parties, and articles published in the nation's top newspapers. Daily issue frequencies within media were analyzed using time series analysis. A symbiotic relationship was found between agendas in Twitter posts and traditional news, with varying levels of intensity and differential time lags by issue. While traditional media follow candidates on certain topics, on others they are able to predict the political agenda on Twitter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-380
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Computer-Mediated Communication
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Time series analysis

Keywords

  • Agenda setting
  • Campaigns
  • New media
  • Presidential primary
  • Social media
  • Twitter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

The Rise of Twitter in the Political Campaign : Searching for Intermedia Agenda-Setting Effects in the Presidential Primary. / Conway, Bethany A.; Kenski, Kate M; Wang, Di.

In: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.07.2015, p. 363-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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