The role of intuitive heuristics in students' thinking: Ranking chemical substances

Jenine Maeyer, Vicente A Talanquer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The characterization of students' cognitive biases is of central importance in the development of curriculum and teaching strategies that better support student learning in science. In particular, the identification of shortcut reasoning procedures (heuristics) used by students to reduce cognitive load can help us devise strategies to foster the development of more analytical ways of thinking. The central goal of this study was thus to investigate the reasoning heuristics used by undergraduate chemistry students when solving a traditional academic task (ranking chemical substances based on the relative value of a physical or chemical property). For this purpose, a mixed-methods research study was completed based on quantitative results collected using a ranking-task questionnaire and qualitative data gathered through semistructured interviews. Our results revealed that many study participants relied frequently on one or more of the following heuristics to make their decisions: recognition, representativeness, one-reason decision making, and arbitrary trend. These heuristics allowed students to generate answers in the absence of requisite knowledge; unfortunately, they often led students astray. Our results suggest the need to create more opportunities for college chemistry students to monitor their thinking, develop and apply analytical ways of reasoning, and evaluate the effectiveness of shortcut reasoning procedures in different contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)963-984
Number of pages22
JournalScience Education
Volume94
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

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chemistry
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teaching strategy
Heuristics
Chemical Substances
Ranking
decision making
curriculum
questionnaire
interview
science
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

The role of intuitive heuristics in students' thinking : Ranking chemical substances. / Maeyer, Jenine; Talanquer, Vicente A.

In: Science Education, Vol. 94, No. 6, 11.2010, p. 963-984.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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