The Role of Labor Struggle in the Shifting Ethnic Composition of Labor Markets

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One dominant theme of the current immigration debate is that immigrants (and particularly the undocumented) fill jobs that nobody wants. While it is sometimes recognized that immigrants fill occupations previously occupied by African Americans, commentators seldom acknowledge that in some cases, this substitution is a response to rising labor conflict. The article presents quantitative and qualitative evidence that allows the rejection of the conventional wisdom (jobs that nobody wants) and advances an alternative hypothesis: immigrant hiring was a management strategy to deal with rising native labor agitation. I use the case of poultry processing in the southeastern United States to elaborate this argument.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-218
Number of pages30
JournalLabor Studies Journal
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

labor market
immigrant
labor
hiring
substitution
wisdom
immigration
occupation
management
evidence
Labor
Immigrants
Labour Market
Labour market
American
Rejection
Wisdom
Immigration
Conventional
African Americans

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • jobs
  • poultry
  • unions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial relations
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

The Role of Labor Struggle in the Shifting Ethnic Composition of Labor Markets. / Schwartzman, Kathleen C.

In: Labor Studies Journal, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.01.2009, p. 189-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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