The role of parasites in generating evolutionary novelty

D. Bermudes, Keith A Joiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this review, David Bermudes and Keith joiner discuss the interrelationship between parasitism and mutualism and examine the parallel mechanisms used by parasites and mutualists to access and persist within the intracellular environment. By drawing analogies with mutualistic associations, they suggest mechanisms by which some parasites may ultimately benefit their hosts. They further speculate that some hosts may even become dependent upon their parasites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)458-463
Number of pages6
JournalParasitology Today
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Parasites
Symbiosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology

Cite this

The role of parasites in generating evolutionary novelty. / Bermudes, D.; Joiner, Keith A.

In: Parasitology Today, Vol. 9, No. 12, 1993, p. 458-463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e1c7d1a897ac42df929523d6168636f2,
title = "The role of parasites in generating evolutionary novelty",
abstract = "In this review, David Bermudes and Keith joiner discuss the interrelationship between parasitism and mutualism and examine the parallel mechanisms used by parasites and mutualists to access and persist within the intracellular environment. By drawing analogies with mutualistic associations, they suggest mechanisms by which some parasites may ultimately benefit their hosts. They further speculate that some hosts may even become dependent upon their parasites.",
author = "D. Bermudes and Joiner, {Keith A}",
year = "1993",
doi = "10.1016/0169-4758(93)90100-T",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "458--463",
journal = "Trends in Parasitology",
issn = "1471-4922",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of parasites in generating evolutionary novelty

AU - Bermudes, D.

AU - Joiner, Keith A

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - In this review, David Bermudes and Keith joiner discuss the interrelationship between parasitism and mutualism and examine the parallel mechanisms used by parasites and mutualists to access and persist within the intracellular environment. By drawing analogies with mutualistic associations, they suggest mechanisms by which some parasites may ultimately benefit their hosts. They further speculate that some hosts may even become dependent upon their parasites.

AB - In this review, David Bermudes and Keith joiner discuss the interrelationship between parasitism and mutualism and examine the parallel mechanisms used by parasites and mutualists to access and persist within the intracellular environment. By drawing analogies with mutualistic associations, they suggest mechanisms by which some parasites may ultimately benefit their hosts. They further speculate that some hosts may even become dependent upon their parasites.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027485659&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027485659&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0169-4758(93)90100-T

DO - 10.1016/0169-4758(93)90100-T

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 458

EP - 463

JO - Trends in Parasitology

JF - Trends in Parasitology

SN - 1471-4922

IS - 12

ER -