The role of regional science in migration and population research

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article considers regional science's role in contributing to migration research, and population research more generally. Beyond the intrinsic appeal of regional science's systems approach, migration analysis was one of our multidisciplinary field's success stories from the late 1960s through the early 1980s because of a widespread production of results that were of inherent interest, that were in some cases controversial, and that were successful in provoking policy discussions. My main argument is that we experience the validation of our belief in the importance of analytical, theory-driven perspectives on the world when the theoretical expertise and analytical rigor of regional science methods can be brought to bear on real-world empirical issues. Consequently, I argue that we should make population analysis an important, foundational element in regional science training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-83
Number of pages5
JournalReview of Regional Studies
Volume30
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2000

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migration
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migration research
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analysis
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world
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

The role of regional science in migration and population research. / Plane, David.

In: Review of Regional Studies, Vol. 30, No. 1, 2000, p. 79-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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