The role of stigma coping and social support in mediating the effect of societal stigma on internalized stigma, mental health recovery, and quality of life among people with serious mental illness

Julie Chronister, Chih Chin Chou, Hsin Ya Liao

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Abstract

This study investigated the mediating properties of stigma coping and social support on the relationship between societal stigma, internalized stigma, mental health recovery, and quality of life among people with serious mental illness (SMI). Participants were 101 adults with SMI living in New York City and Boston. We used 11 measures to assess the study variables. Descriptive statistics, correlational analyses, and structural equation modeling were used to analyze the data. Results showed that secrecy and withdrawal coping and emotional and tangible support mediate the effect of societal stigma on internalized stigma and recovery. Challenging and educating others coping were frequently used and positively linked to recovery. The sample reported low levels of social support and social support was linked to higher levels of societal and internalized stigma and lower levels of recovery and quality of life. Social support and coping should be incorporated into treatment to reduce the negative effects of stigma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)582-600
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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