The selection effects of the inclusion of a chiropractic benefit on the patient population of a managed health care organization

Craig F. Nelson, R. Douglas Metz, Thomas M. LaBrot, Kenneth R Pelletier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study is to measure the selection effects of the inclusion of a chiropractic benefit on a managed care health plan. Design: An analysis of enrollment data from a managed care health plan over a 4-year period was conducted. Employers could select the managed care plan with or without a chiropractic care benefit. Comparisons of demographic and comorbid characteristics were made between employees who had the chiropractic benefit and those who did not, and between individuals who self-selected chiropractic care and those who self-selected medical care. Results: The cohort with chiropractic coverage was younger with fewer subjects in the older age group (>65 years; 6.5% vs 9.6%) and more subjects in the younger age group (0-17 years; 31.9% vs 26.2%). The mean age of the group with coverage was 32.9 compared with 35.5 in the group without coverage. Comparing self-selected chiropractic patients to self-selected medical patients, there were fewer subjects older than 65 years in the chiropractic group (4.9% vs 9.2%) and fewer subjects aged 0 to 17 years (9.4% vs 19.4%). In 6 of the 8 comorbid conditions studied, the rates were lower in the cohort with chiropractic coverage compared with the group without coverage. The rates of comorbid conditions in self-selected chiropractic patients were lower in all 8 categories compared with self-selected medical patients. Conclusion: The inclusion of a chiropractic benefit in a health plan produces a modest favorable selection processes resulting in a slightly younger patient population with fewer comorbidities. At the level of patient self-selection, chiropractic patients are considerably younger and healthier than comparable medical patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-169
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Fingerprint

Chiropractic
Managed Care Programs
Organizations
Delivery of Health Care
Population
Age Groups
Health
Patient Selection
Comorbidity
Demography

Keywords

  • Chiropractic
  • Demography
  • Managed Care Plans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

The selection effects of the inclusion of a chiropractic benefit on the patient population of a managed health care organization. / Nelson, Craig F.; Metz, R. Douglas; LaBrot, Thomas M.; Pelletier, Kenneth R.

In: Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Vol. 28, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 164-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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