The sensitive giant: The role of titin-based stretch sensing complexes in the heart

Melanie K. Miller, Hendrikus "Henk" Granzier, Elisabeth Ehler, Carol Gregorio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Every heart beat is not equal. As physiological demands of the cardiovascular system change, cardiac myocytes modulate contractile parameters including the rate and force of contraction. Adaptive responses require the sensing of biomechanical signals involving the interface between the contractile cytoskeleton (myofibrils) and the sarcolemma at specialized cell-cell junctions (intercalated discs) and cell-substrate adhesion complexes (costameres). Recent studies have shed insight into how protein complexes within cardiac myocytes sense biomechanical signals, processes required for normal adaptive or pathological responses. This new evidence suggests that complexes associated with the giant, myofibrillar protein titin sense myocyte stretch. Here, we discuss evidence supporting titin being an ideal biomechanical sensor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-126
Number of pages8
JournalTrends in Cell Biology
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

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Connectin
Cardiac Myocytes
Costameres
Sarcolemma
Intercellular Junctions
Myofibrils
Cardiovascular System
Cytoskeleton
Cell Adhesion
Muscle Cells
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The sensitive giant : The role of titin-based stretch sensing complexes in the heart. / Miller, Melanie K.; Granzier, Hendrikus "Henk"; Ehler, Elisabeth; Gregorio, Carol.

In: Trends in Cell Biology, Vol. 14, No. 3, 03.2004, p. 119-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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