The syntax of argument structure: Evidence from Italian complex predicates

Raffaella Folli, Heidi B Harley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper provides an analysis of Italian complex predicates formed by combining a feminine nominalization in-ata and one of three light verbs: fare 'make', dare 'give' and prendere 'take'. We show that the constraints governing the choice of light verb follow from a syntactic approach to argument structure, and that several interpretive differences between complex and simplex predicates formed from the same verb root can be accounted for in a compositional, bottom-up approach. These differences include variation in creation vs. affected interpretations of Theme objects, implications concerning the size of the event described, the (un)availability of a passive alternant, and the agentivity or lack thereof of the subject argument.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-125
Number of pages33
JournalJournal of Linguistics
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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syntax
pricing
interpretation
event
lack
evidence
Syntax
Light Verbs
Argument Structure
Complex Predicates
Alternant
Nominalization
Bottom-up
Agentivity
Verbs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Philosophy

Cite this

The syntax of argument structure : Evidence from Italian complex predicates. / Folli, Raffaella; Harley, Heidi B.

In: Journal of Linguistics, Vol. 49, No. 1, 03.2013, p. 93-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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