The temple of the winged lions, petra reassessing a nabataean ritual complex

Pauline Piraud-Fournet, John D.M. Green, Noreen Doyle, Pearce Paul Creasman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Temple of the Winged Lions (TWL) in Petra is a Nabataean-and Roman-era ritual complex thought to have been founded in the early first century CE (ban-ner photograph and fig. 1). It fell out of use following a major earthquake in 363 CE. This is a contextually rich site for the study of ancient ritual, economy, and society in the Nabataean and Greco-Roman world and part of a larger complex including workshops and domestic spaces. The deity (or deities) once worshiped there remains unknown. The most common suggestion is that the temple was dedicated to Al-‘Uzza, the Arabian divinity whose Greek equivalent was Aphrodite.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-305
Number of pages13
JournalNear Eastern Archaeology
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • History
  • Archaeology

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