The Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls (TAAG): From theory to implementation in middle school physical activity promotion

John P. Elder, Leslie A. Lytle, Deborah R. Young, Larry Webber, Russell Pate, June Stevens, Charlotte Pratt, Timothy Lohman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls study (TAAG), a randomized, controlled field trial, was conducted from 2000 to 2006 in six different states in the United States of America (USA). Thirty-six middle schools were randomly assigned to intervention or control (3 intervention and 3 control schools at each site). The intervention targeted the entire population of girls at each school. A cross-sectional sample of girls were randomly selected and measured, regardless of their participation in any aspects of the intervention (Stevens, Murray, Catellier, Lytle, Elder et al., 2005). The intervention was based on a broad version of the socio-ecological model, comprising elements of: operant conditioning; social cognitive theory; organizational change, and diffusion of innovations. This chapter discusses the development of the intervention within the context of these theories, outlines how TAAG addressed the: physical environment; the social environment; individual factors; reviews process evaluation data; and study outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCurrent Issues and Controversies in School and Community Health, Sport and Physical Education
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages185-196
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781621003274
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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