The use of tree-ring chronologies to show spatial and temporal changes in an air mass boundary

Connie Woodhouse, P. A. Kay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eleven tree-ring chronologies on either side of a winter air mass boundary in the western United States are examined for evidence of spatial patterning of tree growth consistent with the boundary. Principal components analyses group the chronologies into three regions. Analyses of 100-yr time periods, overlapped by 50 years, show changes in group membership over time. The Great Salt Lake sites consistently group together into a distinct region. The zonal differentiation of the regions and inferred orientation of the climatic boundary was a feature of the 18th and 19th centuries. The orientation was more meridional in the 20th century, as it had been in the 17th and early 18th centuries. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-190
Number of pages19
JournalPhysical Geography
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

tree ring
air mass
Lakes
chronology
Salts
air
Air
saline lake
group membership
Group
winter
evidence
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

The use of tree-ring chronologies to show spatial and temporal changes in an air mass boundary. / Woodhouse, Connie; Kay, P. A.

In: Physical Geography, Vol. 11, No. 2, 1990, p. 172-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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