Thermostabilization of enteroviruses by estuarine sediment.

P. F. Liew, Charles P Gerba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of estuarine sediment on the thermoinactivation of poliovirus type 1 and echovirus type 1 was evaluated. Poliovirus survival was prolonged at 24 and 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C in the presence of sediment over the time periods observed. Further inactivation studies were performed at 50 and 55 degrees C to maximize the thermal effects, and similar protection was observed. The supernatant fluid from a mixture of seawater and sediment lacked the protective effect against thermoinactivation, suggesting that prolonged virus survival in the presence of sediment was due to adsorption to particulates. From these observations, it appears that the adsorption of enteroviruses to estuarine sediments may play a significant role in protecting them against thermoinactivation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-308
Number of pages4
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume40
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

estuarine sediments
Enterovirus
Poliovirus
estuarine sediment
Adsorption
Enterovirus C
Human Enterovirus B
sediments
Seawater
adsorption
sediment
Hot Temperature
Viruses
temperature effect
protective effect
virus
inactivation
particulates
seawater
heat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Thermostabilization of enteroviruses by estuarine sediment. / Liew, P. F.; Gerba, Charles P.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 40, No. 2, 08.1980, p. 305-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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