Thermotolerance of leaf discs from four isoprene-emitting species is not enhanced by exposure to exogenous isoprene

Barry A. Logan, Russell Monson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of exogenously supplied isoprene on chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics were examined in leaf discs of four isoprene-emitting plant species, kudzu (Pueraria lobata [Willd.] Ohwi.), velvet bean (Mucuna sp.), quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), and pussy willow (Salix discolor Muhl). Isoprene, supplied to the leaves at either 18 μL L-1 in compressed air or 21 μL L-1 in N2, had no effect on the temperature at which minimal fluorescence exhibited an upward inflection during controlled increases in leaf-disc temperature. During exposure to 1008 μmol photons m-2 s-1 in an N2 atmosphere, 21 μL L-1 isoprene had no effect on the thermally induced inflection of steady-state fluorescence. The maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry decreased sharply as leaf-disc temperature was increased; however, this decrease was unaffected by exposure of leaf discs to 21 μL L-1 isoprene. Therefore, there were no discernible effects of isoprene on the occurrence of symptoms of high-temperature damage to thylakoid membranes. Our data do not support the hypothesis that isoprene enhances leaf thermotolerance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)821-825
Number of pages5
JournalPlant Physiology
Volume120
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 1999
Externally publishedYes

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heat tolerance
Mucuna
leaves
Pueraria
Salix
Pueraria montana var. lobata
Temperature
Fluorescence
Populus tremuloides
fluorescence
temperature
Compressed Air
Mucuna pruriens
Populus
Photochemistry
Thylakoids
Photosystem II Protein Complex
photochemistry
Chlorophyll
isoprene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Thermotolerance of leaf discs from four isoprene-emitting species is not enhanced by exposure to exogenous isoprene. / Logan, Barry A.; Monson, Russell.

In: Plant Physiology, Vol. 120, No. 3, 07.1999, p. 821-825.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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