Three-dimensional image visualization using the real-time confocal scanning optical microscope

Lloyd J LaComb, Timothy R. Corle, Neil S. Levine

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of the real-time confocal scanning optical microscope (RSOM) has made it easy for those familiar with standard optical microscopes to use the excellent range definition and cross-sectioning ability afforded by the RSOM to inspect integrated circuits. The ability of the RSOM to optically section a sample allows us to construct three-dimensional (3D) image projections of the sample surface. The depth response function, |V(z)|2, of the microscope can be used to relate the relative height of a particular point on the sample to the received intensity allowing the surface to be reconstructed from the microscope image. Surface reconstructions based upon this method are shown to have comparable resolution to information from each optical section to determine the 'coarse' height at each pixel location. Height variations within each section can be calculated using the received intensity at each pixel location in conjunction with the depth response function of the microscope. The intra-layer height variations are added to the coarse height at each pixel location to produce a map of the integrated circuit surface. The surface reconstruction can be shaded according to the strength of the received signal or with a lighting model to emphasize different properties of the surface. The surface reconstruction calculated using the depth response function of the microscope can be correlated to the surface roughness of the material. The surface roughness of a metal film is measured using the RSOM and compared to values obtained with a stylus profilometer. The effect of focal position on 3D image construction and defect detection is considered by examining several overlay structures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsWilliam H. Arnold
PublisherPubl by Int Soc for Optical Engineering
Pages91-101
Number of pages11
Volume1261
ISBN (Print)0819403083
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes
EventIntegrated Circuit Metrology, Inspection, and Process Control IV - San Jose, CA, USA
Duration: Mar 5 1990Mar 6 1990

Other

OtherIntegrated Circuit Metrology, Inspection, and Process Control IV
CitySan Jose, CA, USA
Period3/5/903/6/90

Fingerprint

optical microscopes
Microscopes
Visualization
Scanning
scanning
microscopes
Surface reconstruction
pixels
integrated circuits
Pixels
surface roughness
Integrated circuits
profilometers
Surface roughness
metal films
illuminating
projection
Lighting
defects
Metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

LaComb, L. J., Corle, T. R., & Levine, N. S. (1990). Three-dimensional image visualization using the real-time confocal scanning optical microscope. In W. H. Arnold (Ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 1261, pp. 91-101). Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering.

Three-dimensional image visualization using the real-time confocal scanning optical microscope. / LaComb, Lloyd J; Corle, Timothy R.; Levine, Neil S.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / William H. Arnold. Vol. 1261 Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering, 1990. p. 91-101.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

LaComb, LJ, Corle, TR & Levine, NS 1990, Three-dimensional image visualization using the real-time confocal scanning optical microscope. in WH Arnold (ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 1261, Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering, pp. 91-101, Integrated Circuit Metrology, Inspection, and Process Control IV, San Jose, CA, USA, 3/5/90.
LaComb LJ, Corle TR, Levine NS. Three-dimensional image visualization using the real-time confocal scanning optical microscope. In Arnold WH, editor, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 1261. Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering. 1990. p. 91-101
LaComb, Lloyd J ; Corle, Timothy R. ; Levine, Neil S. / Three-dimensional image visualization using the real-time confocal scanning optical microscope. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / William H. Arnold. Vol. 1261 Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering, 1990. pp. 91-101
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