Three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing calculus II: Retardance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concept of retardance is critically analyzed for ray paths through optical systems described by a three-by-three polarization ray-tracing matrix. Algorithms are presented to separate the effects of retardance from geometric transformations. The geometric transformation described by a "parallel transport matrix" characterizes nonpolarizing propagation through an optical system, and also provides a proper relationship between sets of local coordinates along the ray path. The proper retardance is calculated by removing this geometric transformation from the three-by-three polarization ray-tracing matrix. Two rays with different ray paths through an optical system can have the same polarization ray-tracing matrix but different retardances. The retardance and diattenuation of an aluminum-coated three fold-mirror system are analyzed as an example.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2866-2874
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Optics
Volume50
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 20 2011

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calculus
Ray tracing
ray tracing
rays
Optical systems
Polarization
polarization
matrices
optical paths
Mirrors
mirrors
aluminum
Aluminum
propagation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing calculus II : Retardance. / Yun, Garam; Mcclain, Stephen C; Chipman, Russell A.

In: Applied Optics, Vol. 50, No. 18, 20.06.2011, p. 2866-2874.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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