Time-resolved investigation of coherently controlled electric currents at a metal surface

J. Güdde, M. Rohleder, T. Meier, Stephan W Koch, U. Höfer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of current dynamics in solids have been hindered by insufficiently brief trigger signals and electronic detection speeds. By combining a coherent control scheme with photoelectron spectroscopy, we generated and detected lateral electron currents at a metal surface on a femtosecond time scale with a contact-free experimental setup. We used coherent optical excitation at the light frequencies ωa and ωa/2 to induce the current, whose direction was controlled by the relative phase between the phase-locked laser excitation pulses. Time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy afforded a direct image of the momentum distribution of the excited electrons as a function of time. For the first (n = 1) image-potential state of Cu(100), we found a decay time of 10 femtoseconds, attributable to electron scattering with steps and surface defects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1287-1291
Number of pages5
JournalScience
Volume318
Issue number5854
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 23 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Metals
Photoelectron Spectroscopy
Electrons
Lasers
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Time-resolved investigation of coherently controlled electric currents at a metal surface. / Güdde, J.; Rohleder, M.; Meier, T.; Koch, Stephan W; Höfer, U.

In: Science, Vol. 318, No. 5854, 23.11.2007, p. 1287-1291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Güdde, J. ; Rohleder, M. ; Meier, T. ; Koch, Stephan W ; Höfer, U. / Time-resolved investigation of coherently controlled electric currents at a metal surface. In: Science. 2007 ; Vol. 318, No. 5854. pp. 1287-1291.
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