Time–space distanciation: An empirically supported integrative framework for the cultural psychology of time and space

Lucas A. Keefer, Sheridan A. Stewart, Roman Palitsky, Daniel L Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

While researchers in social psychology often explore space and time in isolation, the relations between these dimensions are rarely considered. To address this gap, we explore a model of Time–Space Distanciation, the extent to space and time are abstracted from one another in the cultural coordination of activity. We introduce this construct with an emphasis on its interdisciplinary roots and its status as a feature of both group- and individual-level psychology. We then offer three studies providing initial evidence of the distinctiveness of this variable at both levels. We find that (1) state-level time–space distanciation is related to, but distinct from, collectivism and cultural tightness and (2) it has important implications for collective well-being. We further found that (3) individual-level time–space distanciation is associated with a wide range of trait differences. We conclude by describing the implications of this research for the study of time, space, and their connection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-332
Number of pages36
JournalTime and Society
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Keywords

  • collectivism
  • Cultural psychology
  • modernism
  • time and space
  • well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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