Toe and flow: Essential components and structure of the amputation prevention team

Lee C. Rogers, George Andros, Joseph Caporusso, Lawrence B. Harkless, Joseph L Mills, David G Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

At the end of an anatomical peninsula, the foot in diabetes is prone to short- and long-term complications involving neuropathy, vasculopathy, and infection. Effective management requires an interdisciplinary effort focusing on this triad. Herein, we describe the key factors leading to foot complications and the critical skill sets required to assemble a team to care for them. Although specific attention is given to a conjoined model involving podiatric medicine and vascular surgery, the so-called toe and flow model, we further outline three separate programmatic models of care-basic, intermediate, and center of excellence - that can be implemented in the developed and developing world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-348
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
Volume100
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2010

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Toes
Amputation
Foot
Cardiology
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Podiatry

Cite this

Toe and flow : Essential components and structure of the amputation prevention team. / Rogers, Lee C.; Andros, George; Caporusso, Joseph; Harkless, Lawrence B.; Mills, Joseph L; Armstrong, David G.

In: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, Vol. 100, No. 5, 09.2010, p. 342-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rogers, Lee C. ; Andros, George ; Caporusso, Joseph ; Harkless, Lawrence B. ; Mills, Joseph L ; Armstrong, David G. / Toe and flow : Essential components and structure of the amputation prevention team. In: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association. 2010 ; Vol. 100, No. 5. pp. 342-348.
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