Tools and recent progress in studying gene flow and population genetics of the Bemisia tabaci sibling species group

Margarita Hadjistylli, Judith K. Brown, George K. Roderick

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of molecular markers in the Bemisia tabaci complex has been a definitive step in identifying the enormous genetic diversity hidden behind the morphological likeness among its members (see Gill and Brown, Chapter 1), and in determining interrelationships. The presence of biologically-based biotypes in B. tabaci was first realized in the 1950s by Bird (Bird 1957; Bird and Maramorosch 1978), who found that morphologically indistinguishable populations of the whitefly differed substantially in biological and ecological traits, including host range, adaptability to different hosts, and plant virus-transmission efficiencies. Later studies used ecological and biological experiments to examine mating compatibilities as well as differences among distinct populations in phytotoxic induction, insecticide resistance, behavior (Brown et al. 1995b).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBemisia
Subtitle of host publicationBionomics and Management of a Global Pest
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages69-103
Number of pages35
ISBN (Print)9789048124596
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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    Hadjistylli, M., Brown, J. K., & Roderick, G. K. (2010). Tools and recent progress in studying gene flow and population genetics of the Bemisia tabaci sibling species group. In Bemisia: Bionomics and Management of a Global Pest (pp. 69-103). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-90-481-2460-2_3