Toward Atheory of Automated Group Work: The Deindividuating Effects of Anonymity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent developments in information systems technology have made it possible for individ- uals to work together anonymously using networked personal computers. Use of one such technology, the Group Decision Support System, is growing quickly. However, empirical GDSS research is only beginning to emerge, and, as of yet, this literature lacks a sound guiding theory. In this article we propose a theory of anonymous interaction. Grounded in social psychological research in deindividuation and sociallcognitive loafing, we explain anonymous GDSS interaction. Evidence is provided to suggest that anonymity has deindividuating effects on group process and can, therefore, influence group outcomes in several ways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-348
Number of pages16
JournalSmall Group Research
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Technology
Empirical Research
Group Processes
Microcomputers
Information Systems
Psychology
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Toward Atheory of Automated Group Work : The Deindividuating Effects of Anonymity. / Jessup, Leonard Michael; Connolly, Terence; Tansik, David A.

In: Small Group Research, Vol. 21, No. 3, 1990, p. 333-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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